Hagi ware

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As with many of the major potteries in Japan, the origins of Hagi yaki can be traced back to the influx of Korean potters to Japan following military manoeuvres abroad. In 1592, Toyotomi Hideyoshi, a famous warlord and important historical figure, conducted a disastrous campaign on the Korean peninsula. His efforts were not entirely in vain however as he forcibly brought back Korean craftsmen, who under the patronage of the local lord Mori Terumoto, went on to produce wares which developped into Hagi yaki as we know it today. A demand for tea ceremony goods from the moneyed classes kept the Hagi potters in business and the simple rustic shapes with a delicate transluscent white glaze found favor with tea ceremony masters, giving Hagi yaki a certain cachet and ensuring its position as one of the most prestigious potteries in Japan.

Aohagi cup by Noutomi Susumu

Aohagi cup by Noutomi Susumu

Aohagi Mentori guinomi by Noutomi Susumu

Aohagi tea bowl by Noutomi Susumu

Aohagi Mentori guinomi by Noutomi Susumu

Aohagi Mentori guinomi Noutomi Susumu

Aohagi tea bowl by Noutomi Susumu

Aohagi Mentori guinomi by Noutomi Susumu

Various footed cups by Choun kiln of Noutomi Susumu

Aohagi tea cup by Noutomi Susumu

Kakewake yunomi by Noutomi Susumu

Aohagi wan #1(pair) by Noutomi Susumu

Aohagi houhin by Noutomi Susumu

Aohagi houhin by Noutomi Susumu SOLD

Yohen yunomi (large) by Mukuhara Kashun

Shirahagi yunomi (large) by Mukuhara Kashun

Yohen yunomi (large) by Mukuhara Kashun

Yohen shira hagi yunomi (large) by Mukuhara Kashun

Shirahagi yunomi by Mukuhara Kashun

Yohen yunomi (large) by Mukuhara Kashun

Hagi yunomi teacup by Mukuhara Kashun

Biwa (Loquat) yunomi by Mukuhara Kashun SOLD

Hagi yunomi teacup by Mukuhara Kashun

Biwa (Loquat) yunomi by Mukuhara Kashun SOLD

Hagi yohen guinomi by Mukuhara Kashun

Yohen guinomi by Mukuhara Kashun

White hagi guinomi by Mukuhara Kashun

White hagi guinomi by Mukuhara Kashun

White hagi guinomi by Mukuhara Kashun

White hagi guinomi by Mukuhara Kashun

Idogata biwa guinomi by Mukuhara Kashun SOLD

Biwa (loquat) guinomi by Mukuhara Kashun

Kairagi yuzamashi by Mukuhara Kashun

Tsuchinohana guinomi by Mukuhara Kashun SOLD

Haikaburi guinomi by Mukuhara Kashun

Shirahagi kyusu by Mukuhara Kashun

Kairagi houhin by Mukuhara Kashun

Tsuchinohana houhin by Mukuhara Kashun SOLD

Kairagi teapot by Mukuhara Kashun

Kairagi rugged yunomi by Mukuhara Kashun

Kairagi sencha cup (small) by Mukuhara Kashun SOLD

Shira hagi guinomi by Ohtani Masahiko NEW

Shira hagi guinomi by Ohtani Masahiko NEW

Shira hagi tokkuri by Ohtani Masahiko

Shira hagi tokkuri by Ohtani Masahiko

Shira hagi tokkuri by Ohtani Masahiko

Shira hagi tokkuri by Ohtani Masahiko NEW

Shira hagi guinomi by Ohtani Masahiko NEW

Shira hagi guinomi by Ohtani Masahiko NEW

Shira hagi guinomi by Ohtani Masahiko SOLD

Mentori guinomi by Ohtani Masahiko

Mentori guinomi by Ohtani Masahiko

Mentori guinomi by Ohtani Masahiko SOLD

Shira hagi yunomi by Ohtani Masahiko

Shira hagi katakuchi by Ohtani Masahiko

Shira hagi yunomi by Ohtani Masahiko SOLD

Shira hagi yunomi by Ohtani Masahiko

Shira hagi small matcha bowl by Ohtani Masahiko SOLD

Kurinuki guinomi by Kaneta Masanao

Kurinuki yunomi by Kaneta Masanao

Aohagi warikoudai guinomi by Yamane Seigan

Aohagi yunomi by Yamane Seigan

Yohen cup by Yamane Seigan

Kairagi tea bowl by Yamane Seigan SOLD

Kairagi yunomi by Yamane Seigan

Blue flow kyusu by Yamane Seigan

Yohen Aohagi yunomi by Yamane Seigan SOLD

 

Hagi guinomi by Seigan

Sansai warikoudai guinomi by Yamane Seigan SOLD

Ceramic candle holder from Chinshugama kiln

Hagi city
Care instructions for Hagi yaki
Hagi yaki is made of very porous clay. As the items are used, tea deposits seep into the glaze,changing the color. Fans of Hagi yaki view this as a charming characteristic rather than a detraction. One gets the feeling that the items are adapting themselves to the owner's usage and that in time, each piece becomes even more unique and special.
When you first start using Hagi yaki, you may notice an earthy smell. This comes from the clay and will disappear with use, as tea deposits are absorbed into the glaze.
Because of the porous nature of the clay, the use of strong detergent is not recommended. Wash in hot water and dry with a soft cloth. Leave to dry naturally in a shady place before storing. Do not leave fluids standing in the items for any length of time as condensation may gather around the base and damage wooden counters or trays. Also, as the base tends to be rough, be careful when using on polished surfaces.